Lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve / 3D image and Description
Wednesday, 20 April 2016 / Published in Pins, Teaching Anatomy
Lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve – Anatomy Course A continuation of the musculocutaneous nerve in the arm. This nerve becomes the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve once it has emerged from between the biceps brachii and the brachialis muscle, lateral to the biceps brachii tendon, passing behind the cephalic vein. It then divides into two branches, both
Sacrum - ala / 3D image and Description
Wednesday, 06 April 2016 / Published in Pins, Teaching Anatomy
Ala of Sacrum anatomy Ala of sacrum is a large triangular surface either side of sacral base, continuous with iliac fossa (akin to adapted and joined transverse and costal processes elsewhere spine).
Omohyoid / 3D image and Description
Monday, 04 April 2016 / Published in Pins, Teaching Anatomy
Omohyoid Anatomy Origin: Superior border of scapula medial to suprascapular notch. Insertion: Body of hyoid bone. Key Relations: Is one of the infrahyoid muscles (sometimes referred to as ‘strap muscles’) lying in the muscular triangle of the neck. Lateral to sternohyoid. Functions Depresses and fixes the hyoid bone. Supply Nerve Supply: Anterior rami of C1
Subcutaneous prepatellar bursa / 3D image and Description
Friday, 01 April 2016 / Published in Pins, Teaching Anatomy
Subcutaneous prepatellar bursa Anatomy Subcutaneous Prepatellar Bursa is situated in front of the patella bone. Functions Acts as a cushion between bone and skin reducing friction between both. Clinical Prepatellar bursitis or ‘housemaid’s knee’ is a common injury to the bursa. The bursa becomes swollen due to repetitive work in a kneeling position.
Acromioclavicular Joint / 3D image and Description
Friday, 18 March 2016 / Published in Pins, Teaching Anatomy
Acromioclavicular Joint / Motion The acromioclavicular joint is classified as a multiaxial synovial plane joint but it is more helpful to think of it as a pivot point. As the name suggests it is the articulation of the acromion of the scapula with the clavicle. It allows you to raise your arms above your head
Trapezius / 3D image and Description
Wednesday, 16 March 2016 / Published in Pins, Teaching Anatomy
Trapezius / Anatomy Origin: Superior nuchal line of the occipital bone, external occipital protuberance, ligamentum nuchae and spinous processes of C7 to T12. Insertion: Superior fibres: posterior border of the lateral third of the clavicle. Middle fibres: medial border of the acromion and the superior edge of the spine of the scapula. Inferior fibres: tubercle
Hyoid / 3D image and Description
Monday, 14 March 2016 / Published in Pins, Teaching Anatomy
Hyoid – Anatomy Hyoid is a Lingual bone, U-shaped, in front of neck, between larynx (behind) and mandible (in front), at level of C3; made up of body (transverse), greater horns/cornus (long, pointing back), lesser cornus/horns (short, pointing up); suspended from tips of styloid processes of mandible by ligaments (this syndesmotic connection being its only
Cricoid cartilage / 3D image and Description
Thursday, 10 March 2016 / Published in Pins, Teaching Anatomy
Cricoid cartilage The most inferior part of the laryngeal cartilages and completely encircles the trachea. It is shaped like a signet ring with a broad lamina of cricoid cartilage posteriorly and a much slimmer arch of cartilage anteriorly completing the circle.
Thursday, 17 December 2015 / Published in Main Blog, Teaching Anatomy
Health Literacy: when I was caring for patients in clinical practice, I spent time teaching them about their bodies, the conditions that brought them for care, and reviewing the results of any laboratory tests that had been done, as well as discussing the medications that had been prescribed. In each of these situations, I relied
Learning Anatomy in the Digital Age
Thursday, 22 October 2015 / Published in Main Blog, Teaching Anatomy
Learning Anatomy: the human body is an exciting frontier to explore—from the first time you outline your body on paper in kindergarten to see how all the parts fit together; to middle school when you learn how stomach acids work to digest food; to high school when you’ve broken your arm playing football; to college